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how dare bob costas talk about gun control. >> stephanie: oh boy. he is not even in politics. he just said something reasonable. like this domestic situation would not have resolved this way if he didn't have a gun. >> caller: and any situation that they can be on the wrong side of they find it tweet it say it and it drives me insane. >> stephanie: exactly. and bob costas is satan now. >> we'll have some of that coming up in right-wing world. >> stephanie: good tease. nicely done. >> stephanie: thank you. >> stephanie: jay carney. >> what we hope for is specificity from republicans. >> stephanie: and they gone none. [ buzzer ] >> stephanie: this is what mitt romney was criticized for, was he was not specific. >> uh-huh. >> stephanie: and the math just does not work. jay carney again. >> making vague promises about achieving revenue through capping deductions or closing loopholes simply doesn't add up to a serious proposal. >> stephanie: yes, exactly. -- their proposal is the one that is unserious. >> flabbergasted about it's unserousness,ness,ness. >> stephanie: it's l
the fiscal cliff. this included chris van hollen. also, senators mark warner and bob corker, a republican from tennessee. this is one hour. >> good morning. i'm the head of bloomberg government. thank you for joining us today, and thank you to deloitte for partnering with us in this event. when we launched bloomberg government just about two years ago, we had the aspiration of creating a one-stop shop, with data, tools, news, and analysis to help government affairs and government sales professionals make better and faster decisions. we went a long way toward achieving that aspiration. a big part of it is conversations on the important issues that face our nation today, particularly at the intersection of business and government. today's discussion on the fiscal cliff clearly meets that. we are honored to have such a thoughtful panel. senator mark warner, senator bob corker, congressman chris van hollen, governor tim pawlenty, who is currently president and ceo of the financial services roundtable. moderating our discussion today is al hunt. we always love having al over here. he really pu
, bob doll will be giving us his lineup for stocks. that's coming up at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. at 8:00 eastern, a cnbc exclusive. david tepper, one of the world's top performing hedge fund managers will join us to give us some of his wisdom in a kaerc t can't-miss interview. a lot to talk about with him. in the meantime, why don't we get to some of today's top stories. we could see some movement in the fiscal cliff negotiations. house speaker boehner offering to raise the top tax rates on those making over $1 million a year as well as other measures amounting to $1 trillion in new revenue. that's in exchange for an equal amount in spending cuts. the white house has not yet accepted the proposal. >>> also, apple says it has sold more than 2 million in iphone 5s in china just over the last three days. that's the best ever debut for the iphone line in china. apple is china's second biggest market, although it did lose a lot of market share while they were waiting for that i5 to come out. and citi research has downgraded apple from a hold to a buy. you can see there just below $500. >>
telling us that this is not a balanced plan. they don't like it yet. and then earlier today, senator bob corker was on cnbc kind of pooh-poohing the whole thing. take a listen. >> we're not close to a deal. and i've been trying for three weeks, i've been standing on my head doing cartwheels to try to pivot toward entitlement reform. this is not a deal here. >> so carl, what's going on right now on capitol hill is that speaker boehner is meeting with his republican conference colleagues behind closed doors. we expect that at the top of the next hour, he's going to come out and talk before cameras. we'll get some reaction from his colleagues as well, what they think of this proposal and where they think this negotiation needs to go. but clearly, negotiations are ongoing, and the president and the speaker are coming closer together, whether or not that makes everybody happy or enough people happy to get a deal still remains to be seen, carl. >> eamon, this is a tough one to read. had the biggest movement been in that -- in the line in the sand with regards to how much people need to make to
commanded our respect in a remarkable way. part of it was because of his service in the war. he and bob dole, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se m
. representative howard berman elected in 1982 and served 30 years from the 28th district. representative bob filner sworn in this month as mayor of san diego and served for 20 years. representative laura richardson served for five years from the 37th district. representative pete stark, outgoing dean of our delegation was elected in 1972 and served more than 40 wreers from the 13th district. representative lynn woolsey served for 20 years from the 6th congressional district. much kk said about the distinguished careers of our departing colleagues, but i would like to offer a few remarks of the work i have joined them during their time here in the congress. representative howard berman has served the house for 30 years and i was honored to name him among my closest friends in this body. during his service, he worked on a wide of variety of issues and known as a champion of human rights and standing up for middle class, working class and for the poor in our country. as chair of the foreign affairs committee from 2007 to 2008, mr. berman made great progress on behalf of the less fortunate. he w
" is the nfl at a crossroads. what sportscaster bob costas says about the league's gun and con krugs problem. >>> and "starting point" team heading in to join us. it's lots of things. all waking up. connecting to the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. we're going to wake the world up. and watch, with eyes wide, as it gets to work. cisco. tomorrow starts here. cisco. alriwoah! did you get that? and...flip! yep, look at this. it takes like 20 pictures at a time. i never miss anything. isn't that awesome? uh that's really cool. you should upload these. i know, right? that is really amazing. the pictures are so clear. kevin's a handsome devil that phone does everything! search dog tricks. okay, see if we can teach him something cool. look at how lazy kevin is. kevin, get it together dude cmon, kevin take 20 pictures with burst shot on the galaxy s3. >>> good morning. welcome back. our team this morning, bob shrum is back. you must have had a good time. >> you asked me back. >> and nan ha
's the chief of staff to governor bob macdonald. to denise northrop came from state of oklahoma where she is chief of staff to governor mary phalen and roxanne white is joining us from the great state of colorado where she's chief of staff to governor john hicken looper. and so their full bios are on the pamphlets and nare all very accomplished professionals in their careers. i'm going to ask roxanne to start and we can come down this way. >> great. first, thank you for the report. i think it provides a good framework for all of us as states to continue to look at the challenges facing us. we have been engaged in pension reform in colorado. our pension fund is about 69% solvent. we did major reform in the last administration. and we are now in court trying to defend that reform. our pension costs by 2020 will go to 22%. and so to give you a sense of how far behind we were as a state, if we lose in court and the battle is whether or not we as a state have a right to ratchet down the colas for our state employees, then we could see a need to go to 25% of compensation by 2020. so it's fairly
administration. that's coming up. >>> and bob costas strays from sports into a highly charged political debate. takes a little bit of heat on twitter about it. we're going to talk about that, too. you're watching "starting point. "we're back in just a moment. ♪ [ ding! ] losing your chex mix too easily? time to deploy the boring-potato chip decoy bag. then no one will want to steal the deliciousness. [ male announcer ] with a variety of tastes and textures, only chex mix is a bag of interesting. yep. the longer you stay with us, the more you save. and when you switch from another company to us, we even reward you for the time you spent there. genius. yeah, genius. you guys must have your own loyalty program, right? well, we have something. show her, tom. huh? you should see november! oh, yeah? giving you more. now that's progressive. call or click today. you won't take our future. aids affects us all. even babies. chevron is working to stop mother-to-child transmission. our employees and their families are part of the fight. and we're winning. at chevron nigeria, we haven't had a reported ca
will never lift a finger for you again." >> those are tough words! >> you know the old bob novak, he used to say that republicans were put on earth to cut taxes. and if they don't, they have no purpose. >> no purpose, yeah. >> that was bob novak. you know, all of a sudden we're faced with a set of circumstances where we're talking about cutting taxes on spending, and now we've got stuff on the table to react to, and conservatives don't feel comfortable with what's on the table. >> so what is it that conservatives would like to have happen? in other words, compromise. you need compromise to get a deal done, but you're sort of saying don't compromise. >> no, we're saying have a serious conversation. the president is proposing taking an aspirin when we've got a bad case of pneumonia. you've got a trillion-dollar deficit this year, $172 billion just in november. 60% of our budget more or less is on entitlements. and he's proposing not to touch entitlements? that's a nonstarter. i mean, that is an irresponsible position to take. you've got cost of living -- >> that's not his position. it's not
children to sweat shop work day? >> anyway, let's check with bob pisani with more on what's moving today. >> let's talk about what the trading day's going to look like. that was the main topic of conversation overnight and through this morning. i would note, folks, i know this is not a good open, but we are well above where we were at the close last friday. so we were 1413 last friday at the close, 1427 now. i think on the s&p 500. okay. it's a bad day, a down day, but we're still actually above where we were at the close last year. we're up for the week on the s&p 500. i think the problem now is going to be talking about what the rest of the day's going to look like. my sense talking to everybody is, they'll try to sell at most of the rallies that go on, just to protect themselves for what we've been seeing here. that's going to be a problem. because i know you're hopeful maybe we'll get a move up toward the close. i think selling into the rallies is going to be a general problem. i specifically was talking to people about that today. we've been rallying. the biggest problem that we hav
, he was horrible in debates. >> no, you had to hold your breath all the time. >> and then bob dole, you had to hold your breath. and george w., good old guy, but that guy had trouble with the english language. >> you're going up against bubba. the best on the planet. >> it would be nice to have somebody -- >> no, that's why it was so sad when people like mitch daniels and haley didn't go in this time because they sound like churchill compared. >> guess who i just got an e-mail from? alexandra liebenthal. how exciting. julia, stay with us. >> jean just e-mailed me. >> you're a bad man. i mean, you really are. >> bad to the bone. >> we should do a segment. >> yeah. >> like the conversation we had at the dinner table. and you all have to listen. >> i have no idea what you're talking about. you wrote this past month. did you make your deadline? >> you know, again -- >> david. >> we love david. >> we love david. >> the magazine's awesome. it came with an ax. >> oh. >> i bought it for my mom for christmas. >> that was sweet. >> she'll use it. >> chop up. >> you have no idea. >> actionabl
interesting conversations over the weekend was bob corker saying, let's just go ahead, concede to the tax argument, which would flip the entire spotlight onto entitlements, which is what republicans have been trying to get the discussion to be about over the last couple of weeks. >> when you hear about entitlements, why aren't they talking directly, you know, medicare part b koshcosts x, or medicare a, should cost this. the last thing a republican wants to do is say, look, i'm cutting back medicare. so, i mean, if you switch it to entitlements, suddenly everyone has to say, social security goes from 66 to 68. is that what we do? do we means test medicare? it is so much easier for grover who will be on cnbc, forget the fiscal cliff, i will come after you with both barrels. if you vote tax increase. what's more -- do they want to rise above a tax increase? no. do they want to rise above fiscal cliff? no. what they want it do is not rise above the radar screen of raising taxes. and grover is more powerful than a recession. i asked him point-blank on "meet the press," college chum, look, it d
. in 30 minutes, senator bob corker and kent conrad. and at 9:00 eastern, representative scott garrett and sander levin. remember "squawk on the street." >> that's right. "squawk on the street" we have a lot to come, as well. the two senators we're talking with next, two members of the gang of eight now. we'll talk to them. guys we'll send it back to you right now. >> great. thanks, guys. appreciate that. we are now, though, going to flip it over to phil lebeau who is in new york and he's got breaking news. >> as expected we knew that delta was in negotiations to buy 49% stake in virgin atlantic. the deal has been completed. the price is $360 million for that delta will increase its access to heathrow. that's really the key here. 31 daily nonstop flights. that's all part of what goes between the uk and north america for virgin atlantic. the brand remains, guys. make that clear here. the virgin atlantic brand does not go away. what changes is that delta has a 49% stake in the company. there's going to be a press conference later this morning here in new york. we're going to be talking w
's a question, though, willie, whether you want the job or not. >> right. >> i asked bob riley, i've said this 1,000 times, it seems extraordinarily important if you're a union member in the northeast, and like me, you want your factories running again. i asked bob riley, i don't understand, why did mercedes go to tuscaloosa county, alabama, instead of filling up the factories in connecticut? 15 minutes away from yale. or in rhode island. 20 minutes away from brown. i mean, right by some of the most highly trained, brilliant minds in the world. that's easy. the work force rules are so insane there, there's no way that mercedes or bmw or airbus would ever dream of going to those states. do you want the jobs or do you not want the jobs? >> and that plays out all over the south in harold's home state of tennessee, auto plant comes back, you get a bunch of jobs but at a very low wage. so the question is do you want to lower ourselves to the global standard of wages so that you have many more jobs -- >> that's a better option. >> that question has to be answered -- >> stronger middle class in union s
here. people feel like it really keeps netflix in the game. >> we want to get a little more from bob, who is in the crowd, where berkshire has halted for news pending at this point. bob, there's been talk that berkshire quietly acoming a big stake in avida. that's now 13%. maybe it has other intentions in terms of ownership with that company. >> significant speculation just from what the news pending is. we don't know what it is. but i want to note, melissa, berkshire class a and class b shares are both halted news pending. the crowd is just sort of standing around here with orders to buy or sell, waiting to find out exactly what the news is going to be. you'll notice we're up again today. the sixth day in a row the dow industrials are up. optimism on the fiscal cliff being resolved. i'll tell you this, somebody's very wrong about 2013, because there's two camps that are quite at odds with each other right now. the first one i've been telling you about, it's been quat bearish on this. that the fiscal cliff will be a headwind for stocks. that this represents the start of a new america
from the progressive policy institute. we have senator bob packwood from oregon, former chairman of the senate finance committee, part of the 1986 negotiations. and the other folks here have been part of the conversation. my only message to the new arrivals, please jump in whenever you see fit. we have an hour to an hour and a half. if you hear something you want to weigh in on, don't wait for me. we're talking now about the other very small issue in this issue and that is tax policy and how best to put the nation on a sustainable fiscal path. the question of revenue, how much, where to get it, the options on the table and would like your thoughts. as you heard from chairman bachus. they need ideas to bridge this gap because we appear to be at a stale mate. i turn it over to john to get your thoughts knowing he has to leave and the center for american progress has come out with some ideas and john maybe you would like to weigh in on some of those and your thoughts on this debate. >> peter, i think following up on this morning's session, clearly to have a balanced approach we need
? who would have thought? i did. we did, bob. we did. got it. but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator working together to help improve your lung function all day. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than twice a day. people with copd taking advair may have a higher chance of pneumonia. advair may increase your risk of osteoporosis and some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking advair. if you're still having difficulty breathing, ask your doctor if including advair could help improve your lung function. get your first full prescription free and save on refills at advaircopd.com. >>> we knew the gop brand was in shamblingb shamblingble, but now we have proof. a new nbc wall street journal poll shows the party favorability ratings is at 30%. close to a 10-year low. well, i'v
jack burkman the nickname of "bob" because he's so often wrong. we might take you up on that. now, conservatives are unchained about this movie because they think there is racism against everybody. white people, plaque black people? how is there racism against black people? this insane headline today, it was by quentinter ten know. you can on what friggin' basis did he write that? he linked it to an article how the movie used that word. it said the "n" word and didn't write it out like this, but who cares, an opportunity to saying is totally inflammatory on my headline. but is he inapplying that terantino is racist against black people? but he was just implying that it was racist against white people. >> i spent my whole life surrounded by black fingers. why don't they just rise up and kill the whites? [ laughing ] >> who knows what could happen. >> in the world you got to get dirty, so that's what i'm doing. i'm getting dirty. >> what's your name? >> jdjango. the "d" is silent. >> cenk: yeah, if you ask me that looks bad ass. but i'm sure i'll be accused of being racist against a
the tremendous service and career of bob morton. a 22-year veteran of the washington state legislature who recently announced that he was going to be retiring at the end of the year. he was first elected to the house in 1990 and then he was appointed to the senate where he currently represents the seventh district, including stevens, and parts of spokane county. he owned a small logging business and ran cattle while also preaching at his local church and serving the community. but bob is not just an outstanding legislator for eastern washington, he's also a close friend. a mentor and the reason that i got into politics and public service in the first place. as an elected official i've worked with him on countless issues and his advice and friendship has been invaluable. he's recognized for his leadership and knowledge, good forest management, no one knows western water law better than bob and he's participated in most of the negotiations over washington water law. bob and his wife linda have five children, 11 grandchildren and i know they're looking forward to spending more time with them
that wasn't a fun time. >> not like in a room having a cocktail. >> dave: how about republican bob corker who talked to greta about the spending cuts that they would like to see from the democrats thus far not on the table. it's a shame in this nation where every developed country in the world knows our fiscal cliff is our fiscal solvency you have to have these leverage points. sit down and solve the problem because we know it's our greatest threat. that's not the case here. we have a president who has not laid out a plan. is he on yulingsly a spendaholic. >> dave: here is the problem for republicans though. if there is no deal out of the senate he will say okay i need an up or down vote on the $250,000 up or down mark. if republicans want to go on record to say no on that. that's going to be very politically dangerous for john boehner in the house. that's the bottom line. >> juliet: i know you are getting a lot of tweets. mine is like i blame, this i blame that guy. it's interesting to hear what you guys have to say about that first, let's go to peter doocy. what happens this weekend as
connell. call al republican senator. right? tom grassley. whatever. there are a lot of people out there, bob corker. i hope stead we keep seeing lindsey graham as if he is the only guy over there. i don't know. i am on a tear this morning. >> he has to have something to do. before the susan rice thing -- >> >> bill: go shopping. >> when i heard lindsey graham talking about susan graham that guy is in the senate? what else could he do? >> good, the war on susan rice. did you make that up? i am loving it. >> bill press is the war on susan rice. >> i will tell you who bill press is this morning, war on john boehner. >> that's who i want to talk to you about. i think it's time for john boehner to get out of the way. just resign. so here is the deal. >> you explain to me. >> you have a bill that will give 98% of the americans a tax cut january 1st. it's already passed the senate. president obama says i will sign it. actually, if you look at t it's not just 98% of americans. it's 100%, up to 250 dollars a year. the only reason that bill not happening is because
policy institute. we have bob packwood from oregon, the former chairman of the senate finance committee. we hope to get your thoughts. the other folks here have been part of the conversation. my only message to the new arrivals, please jump in whenever you see fit. we have about an hour to an hour half.fa i would direct the conversation as best i can. we're talking now about the other very small issue in this debate, and that is tax policy and how best to put the nation on a sustainable fiscal path and incorporate changes in tax policy to get there. the question of revenue, how much, where to get it, the options on the table, and like all your thoughts, they need some ideas. both sides need this to bridge this gap because right now we appear to be a stalemate. i will turn it over to john podesta to get your thoughts. knowing that john has to live, and the center for american progress has come up with ideas, and, john, maybe you would like to weigh in on some of those, and your thoughts on this debate. >> peter, following up on this morning's session, in order that a balanced approach, w
bob corker was on our air earlier today and he laid out sort of what the political challenges here for republicans. take a listen. >> it sure seems to me that we're negotiating about something that makes it appear that all we are trying to do is protect the rich. er with not at all focused on entitlement changes which is the only thing that will save our country. >> so when the speaker now briefs his republican leadership colleagues about whatever was in that meeting yesterday, the trick for him is going to be to present it in a way that he gets there and continues to have support. there is mumbling and grumbling about a particular challenge to speaker boehner about republican colleagues early in the new year. that is something the speaker would like to avoid. he has it find a way to get a deal and keep his job at the same time. all of that is tricky can be tyler. >> thank you very much. let's go to the exclusive patented trade mark cliff-o-meter. are we closer to a deal? no deal. we call it right now, right in the middle. that is closer to a deal than it was late last week. basica
for the bulls, up 106 points on the dow jones industrial average. let's get trading action. bob pisani joins me. that's despite gridlock in washington. >> maybe because of it. take a look at dow jones industrial average. we were up, speaker boehner gave us an update and basically said where is the president on the spending cut issue. we lost ground on that particular news. a couple of sectors doing well. tech outperforming, ambassadors trying to find a trading range between 5 and $6hup, a little more stable. texas instruments raised outlook, chip marks, alter, a, jds among gains. what sequestration worries, they continue to defy gravity. second group strong, airline stocks. good news, delta taking a 49% steak in virgin air, maybe more consolidation. booking trends good recently. a minimal impact from business travel on sandy overall, jet fuel prices continue to drop. let's talk about exchange traded funds. you know them. i'm a big backer. matt hogan here moderating a conference master of all things etfs. we're continuing to see money going in. what's going on? why is etf so high? >> a couple of
that will be calculated, and quite frankly, in a more simplified form been standard tax law. host: professor bob kelly? guest: when i say chaos i am -- professor buckley? >> when i say chaos, i am referring to two things. the irs has done programming based on their being a patch enacted by the end of the year. most tax returns software has made the same calculated gamble. i agree that the government needs revenue. i do not think there is any question of that. if you just say that the amt is a good tax because it raises revenue, i do not argue on the notion that we need money, however is an extraordinarily arbitrary way of raising revenue. it raises revenue not from the super wealthy. the amt applies to few people making more than half of $1 million. it is counter-intuitive. if you are going to raise revenue, it should be as president obama has suggested, shared sacrifice, and that sacrifice has to come from people making more than half of $1 million. host: how do the very wealthy get out of paying the amt? guest: because of the rate structure. the rate between $200,000 and $500,000 are at least as hig
ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. meet the 5-passenger ford c-max hybrid. when you're carrying a lot of weight, c-max has a nice little trait, you see, c-max helps you load your freight, with its foot-activated lift gate. but that's not all you'll see, cause c-max also beats prius v, with better mpg. say hi to the all-new 47 combined mpg c-max hybrid. >>> it was a crime that made headlines across the country in 199, it was all the rage in new york city, the 28-year-old white wall street investment banker jogging through central park when she was brutally assaulted, rained, left for dead. she was in a coma. five black and latino teenagers were arrested and convicted, they became known as the central park five. they spent between 6 and 13 years in prison, until a
to avoid the sequestration. >> bob samuelson, "washington post". i think the proposals are to reduce the marine corps by 20,000, and the army by 80,000 from their peaks, and there's much speculation thamuch speculr cuts in the pentagon budget would reduce the additional cuts in both the army and the marines. if the marines was put in a position where it had to occupy and protected the oil field of the persian gulf for an extended period of time say five or six years are those forces adequate to do the job? >> one of the reasons at least i was able to get through as chairman is to try not to speculate much on hypothet speculate much on hypothetical. the reductions in both the army and the marine corps have been in the budget now, and i think they are in the 13 budget, so basically they have been on the hill, the beginning of them they have been on the hill for the better part of a year and they are reductions both of chiefs of those to services and the chairman also. clearly, and i did as well when i was the chairman over year ago, there was a need to come down. there was an expectati
that as well as the american people. a lot can happen. just as bob said it -- i said in my remarks that the tax issue could get resolved this weekend or it could get resolved at the beginning of next year. it will get resolved. almost all americans will not pay higher taxes next year. but it could happen this weekend. >> the meeting ends today, if there is a proposal put on the table, we're hearing about smaller-scale proposals to get enough republican support in the senate, and not just get 60 votes. do you need an estate tax -- is it ok if it's just different income and unemployment? >> it would be best to let senator mcconnell and others meet with the president today and have them talk about that in private. probably the meeting that happens today is more for optics and probably the substance occurs after that when staff begins to talk. they ought to work on that together, and i think it is best for me not to comment on what should or should not be in it. i want to come back to this -- the 112th congress has scored, litigated, debated every one of the issues that lamar and i are talking abou
by reaching hosted by bob casey. senator bob casey of hearing. >> the committee will come to order. we want to thank everyone for being here today. i did not have a chance to personally greet our witnesses, but i will have time to do that later. i want to thank both of our witnesses for being here. i will have an opening statement that i will make, and then i will turn it to dr. burgess. i know that vice chairman brady will be her as well. we know the challenges that we confront here in congress on a whole range of issues, which are sometimes broadly described under the umbrella of the terminology, fiscal cliff. when we confront those difficult challenges, we have to ask ourselves a couple of basic questions. one of the basic questions we must ask is, what will be the result and will be the impact as it relates to middle income families? what will happen to them in the midst of all these tough issues we have to work out? we know there is broad agreement that going over the so-called fiscal cliff would jeopardize the economic recovery. it would do that by increasing taxes on families, haltin
roger ailes very happy either. speaking of roger ailes, bob woodward story that roger ailes -- mcfarland to iraq to try to persuade -- to try to persuade david petraeus to run against president obama. this guy's totally shameless right, about being an arm of the republican party. doesn't this sort of prove it? >> i mean it shows that he's -- he's just interested in impacting the republican party and getting his guy in the ring than fox is about covering it. it has been reported before that roger urged chris christie to run and then there was a report in 2011 that he had urged petraeus. but this recording really takes it to another level because although casey mcfarland and -- they say it was a joke, you can hear her on the recording over and over again you know trying to get information to bring back to roger. it is not like it was just a quick joke at the end of an interview. she asks repeatedly. they talk about would murdoch bankroll it and maybe petraeus was sort of brushing some of it off. but at the sam
in that demilitarized zone protecting south korea. major general bob scales is a fox news military analyst, and as you watch what north korea is doing, how do you make sense of it, and what type of threat do you think they pose us? >> well, this is a real rubicon, jenna. i mean, the north has finally demonstrated that they have the technology to do three-stage rocketry. and what that means is they have the ability to build an icbm that could reach the western united states, guam, hawaii and, of course, alaska. what they haven't done yet is demonstrate the ability to tip it with a nuclear weapon. look, the payload in this rocket was about 100 kilograms, about 220 pounds. at their stage of nuclear developments, they would -- could miniaturize a nuclear weapon down to it, but they would need to miniaturize it down to about a ton, about 1500-2000 pounds and lift that into orbit. right now they're a long way from that, but that's not the point. jenna, it's now an engineering problem for north korea and not a scientific and technical problem, and that poses a real risk to the united states. jenna: so you sa
are dead, two are injured. let's go to a news conference right now. >> the lieutenant governor bob duffy is graciously agreed to join us and say a few words at the end of the press conference. we have major mark kosten of the new york state police. just an update on the fire scene. the fire, the fires are under control. seven houses have been totally destroyed at the scene. still an active crime scene. we have yet to get into any of the homes. we don't know if there are any additional victims in those homes. and, when that information comes to light we'll certainly give you updates on that. with regards to the homes, the red cross has asked me to put out the phone number, if you would run it for me please, 241-4472 emergency housing. any other needs. they do assistance for any mental health issue that may come in because of this tragedy. clothing, any type of aid possible. 241-4472. they haven't been table to touch bases with all the residents up at the scene at this time. an update on the two shooting victims that i put out earlier. theodore skardeno guard condition. the joe hoffstetter
's a national treasure. >> he is, he is, indeed. bob, thank you so much for being with us. good to see you. >> good to see you, gregg. patti ann: well, all eyes are on the weather as we track that deadly storm heading north right now. we have a live report just three minutes away. gregg: and as violence escalates in syria, a top general reportedly switching sides. the turning point in the civil war? gregg: fox news alert, new watches in effect now for parts of the north and south carolina. all of this part of the deadly storm system that ripped through the south yesterday. let's go to maria molina in the fox extreme weather center. maria? >> reporter: that's right, our storm system still growing, yesterday produced over 30 reports of tornadoes across portions of the south, and today we're still seeing that risk in the form of damaging wind gusts and tornadoes. tornado watch in effect right now across eastern portions of the state of north carolina and also eastern portions of the state of south carolina. basically, what that mean bs is that conditions out here are ripe for these thundersto
is why we're dealing with the debt ceiling again and we just showed i haved why from bob corker and the senator from tennessee talking and he said we'll get the spending cuts in january when the debt ceiling comes up and if you're progressive, we'll have the big spending cuts conversation, which is medicare, medicaid on the table and some of the tax stuff may have been taken care of. >> we're getting close to the top of the hour and the big three coming up with the best and worst of the week. you'll want to hear this next. ke a giant... ♪ and feel like a green giant. ♪ ho ho ho ♪ green giant >> getting close to the top of the hour. back to the big three, for the best week, worst week. perry, i'll start with you, what's your best and worst this week? i picked chuck hagel. he's our defense secretary and he's getting attacked by democrats and republicans very harshly and has no chance to defend himself and for the winner, it's hard to pick a winner right now. washington is not working right now and it's hard to say anyone is doing a great job and this is not a great situation
.r.s., these are the numbers. since 1985, senator bob dole filled the tree -- used the gag rule -- seven times. senator byrd used it three times. senator mitchell used it three times. senator lott, when he was majority leader, used the gag rule 11 times. that is, cut off amendments. senator daschle only one time. senator frist, 15 times sm. those are the majority leaders. since 1985, awful those majority leaders -- all of those majority leaders used it a combined 40 times. our current majority leader, senator reid, has used it, as of yesterday, 69 times since he became leader in 2007. this trend, this gagging of the minority, is the primary cause of the senate's dysfunction. so, madam president, i wanted to correct the record. made a mistake and i'm glad to come. i don't want senator dole get the credit for that when senator byrd actually figured it out of and i want to leave a more -- i want to leave an optimistic -- i want to conclude with an optimistic point. i think most of us -- and i would include the distinguished senator from new hampshire in the chair because we've been together in discussions, bip
, defense secretary bob gates. but you did not have, again, your labor secretary. you didn't have your commerce secretary, your energy secretary. so he relied on sort of the people just around him. i think this administration and the president should do a better job of getting his cabinet out there, because, frankly, most americans don't even know who the rest of the cabinet members are. >> finer point on it, roland. do you think the president is sending a message that he won't fight for his nominees? >> well, i think what he's doing is, he's picking and choosing his battles, but he needs to understand, the last four years, republicans fought him on everything. he should send the signal, i'm not going to play the games we played the last four years. i'm going to be very aggressive, and if you want to deny me my choice, then you should vote that person down. he should have put her forward, and look, if he wants former senator chuck hagel, put him forward as well, and tell the senate, i dare you to do it. >> alice, that brings up an interesting point. tom friedman wrote an op-ed in "the
of the senate foreign relations committee for her work, senator bob menendez on the foreign relations committee. all those were very instrumental in dealing with this. senator durbin who has been a real champion on human rights. i want to acknowledge kyle parker, a staff person from the helsinki commission who was very instrumental in the development of this legislation, and i want to also acknowledge senator lieberman's work. i know he will be speaking in a few minutes. it was senator lieberman and senator mccain and myself that first suggested that we should pass the magnitsky bill, it's the right thing to do, but we certainly shouldn't let pntr go without attaching the magnitsky bill. i want to thank senator lieberman and thank senator mccain for raising that connection. it was the right thing to do. first of all, it allowed us to get this human rights tool enacted. secondly, i think it gave us the best chance to get the pntr bill done in the right form. so i want to thank both of them for their leadership on that. in 1974, we passed the jackson vanik law. it dealt with the failure of the so
and keep your question as brief as you can. >> yes, bob with british medical journal. most of the talk it's been about impact on the federal budget and balancing one versus another. what analysis has been done on the exchanges, on the impact of the employability of seniors if an employer has to carry these additional costs for an extended period of time? by hypothesis would be that they would make them less employable in some ways. either that, or takes away from employers providing insurance. on the consumer side, how is it that these increased costs affect access to care and quality of care? >> paul, do you want to start the first part of that? >> sure. on your first question, i have actually not heard anyone or any of the studies suggest that any of the medicare eligibility age would increase where employers would not offer coverage at all. for the vast majority of them, employers outside of industries where retiree health plans are highly concentrated, in fact the medicare eligibility age would be large in some employees would continue in the workforce longer because of the subsidies
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